Galatea Fine Art

Shading the departed

“ Passage: Forest Hills Cemetery #2  “  (gouache on panel), by Vivki Kocher Paret, in her show “Among Trees,’’ at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, Oct . 31-Dec. 1    The gallery says:    She “studies the visual pathways created by filtered light in environmental settings. Whether it be on the woodland floor, through water, or city buildings, the beauty inspired by the ephemeral nature of trees is found to be an uplifting feature in her work.’’

Passage: Forest Hills Cemetery #2(gouache on panel), by Vivki Kocher Paret, in her show “Among Trees,’’ at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, Oct . 31-Dec. 1

The gallery says:

She “studies the visual pathways created by filtered light in environmental settings. Whether it be on the woodland floor, through water, or city buildings, the beauty inspired by the ephemeral nature of trees is found to be an uplifting feature in her work.’’

P Town's jarring juxtapositions

“Herring Cove Bathhouse Provincetown’’   (  archival pigment print), by Jane Paradise, in her show “Classic Provincetown: Photographs of Provincetown and the Province Lands,’’ through Sept. 29, at Galatea Fine Art, Boston.    The gallery says:    “Provincetown is a jarring combination of natural beauty and thriving commercial enterprise. It is incongruous in its landscape and culture. Parts are so pristine that your eyes hurt with the raw beauty, but in summer it is sometimes so crazy with throngs of people that one can get lost and life can slip by quicker than sand in an hourglass. Two irreconcilable sides. Where the human and natural landscapes mingle to tell a unique story.’’

“Herring Cove Bathhouse Provincetown’’ (archival pigment print), by Jane Paradise, in her show “Classic Provincetown: Photographs of Provincetown and the Province Lands,’’ through Sept. 29, at Galatea Fine Art, Boston.

The gallery says:

“Provincetown is a jarring combination of natural beauty and thriving commercial enterprise. It is incongruous in its landscape and culture. Parts are so pristine that your eyes hurt with the raw beauty, but in summer it is sometimes so crazy with throngs of people that one can get lost and life can slip by quicker than sand in an hourglass. Two irreconcilable sides. Where the human and natural landscapes mingle to tell a unique story.’’

On Commercial Street in Provincetown.

On Commercial Street in Provincetown.

In the Province Lands

In the Province Lands

'Posthumously Blooming'

“Why Art? ‘‘(oil on linen), by Joanne Tarlin, in her show “Posthumously Blooming,’’ at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, July 3-July 28.    The gallery says:    “Joanne Tarlin celebrates her father's life and works in her exhibition "Posthumously Blooming". He was a novelist, among other pursuits, living among poets, painters, musicians and intellectuals; the book was not published and was secreted away until after his death. Entitled The Artist's Life, the book has inspired his daughter's work towards the romantic, moody and atmospheric. Flowers and dissolving text excerpts wind in and out of the surface and reflect the artist's connection with mortalit y.’’

“Why Art? ‘‘(oil on linen), by Joanne Tarlin, in her show “Posthumously Blooming,’’ at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, July 3-July 28.

The gallery says:

“Joanne Tarlin celebrates her father's life and works in her exhibition "Posthumously Blooming". He was a novelist, among other pursuits, living among poets, painters, musicians and intellectuals; the book was not published and was secreted away until after his death. Entitled The Artist's Life, the book has inspired his daughter's work towards the romantic, moody and atmospheric. Flowers and dissolving text excerpts wind in and out of the surface and reflect the artist's connection with mortality.’’

'Harmonious puzzle pieces'

VOLUME 16 (floor Installation, pages from an encyclopedia), and   'Stop!'‘ (mixed media assemblage), by Mary Hurwitz, in the group show "Fact is Fiction’s Inspiration,’’ at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, July 3-28.     The gallery says:    Fact and fiction are harmonious puzzle pieces; a restless combination, where 'fact' is behaving in mundane reality, e.g. eating, drinking, surviving, while fiction is fact's inspiration: a dream, a craze to probe deep truths. These 2-D and 3-D works complement each other in an endless and closed cycle, just as water freezes, turns to liquid, and then to vapor, in a perpetual continuum.’’

VOLUME 16 (floor Installation, pages from an encyclopedia), and 'Stop!'‘ (mixed media assemblage), by Mary Hurwitz, in the group show "Fact is Fiction’s Inspiration,’’ at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, July 3-28.

The gallery says:

Fact and fiction are harmonious puzzle pieces; a restless combination, where 'fact' is behaving in mundane reality, e.g. eating, drinking, surviving, while fiction is fact's inspiration: a dream, a craze to probe deep truths. These 2-D and 3-D works complement each other in an endless and closed cycle, just as water freezes, turns to liquid, and then to vapor, in a perpetual continuum.’’

'Postive and negative shapes'

capezzera.jpg

Frank Capezzera, "Seated Woman (Green)" (mixed media on hardboard), by Frank Capezzera, his show “Form and Field: Humans and Gods in the Moment,’’ at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, July 3-28.

He tells the gallery:

"The depiction of the human and superhuman predates recorded written history, as found in cave wall paintings, rock face petroglyphs and talismans. It is human to be self-aware. It is human to conceive of gods.

This exhibit of acrylics/mixed media paintings represents a summing up of my recent exploration of figurative work.

My aim has been to treat the rendering of the field, or background in which the subject is found, with emphasis equal to that given the subject itself. I begin with preliminary line drawings and mark making, and, through addition, subtraction, deconstruction and reconstruction, search for suggestive images that are ambiguous, perhaps even unreliable in their narratives.

I work from live models, photographs and imagination. I am attracted, both, to figures in action and those in repose. I seek out positive and negative shapes as I compose the image. Some pieces allude to classical artistic forms, such as statuary of gods and goddesses and heroic figures, and others are derived from comic book figures.

My creative process is taken up with the search for solutions to the problems I, myself, create with each succeeding mark or application of pigment, including the decision of when the painting is finished."

And then it eats you

“Silent Encroachment’’ (acrylic on canvas), by Nancy Wood, in her show “Shaping Space, at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, May 1-June 2. The gallery says:    “This series is a visual experiment in stretching, expanding and compressing geometric and optical images. The resulting hypnotic, pulsing, floating patterns, founded in logic, crossover into the emotional realm and provide access to the subconscious. The act of multiplying, dividing, adding, subtracting, and repeating elements by eye and intuition result in a visual translation of an internal experience of the world. Geometry gives way to something more organic and infinite, similar to the evolutionary process in nature. There is an element of trial and error but an opportunity arises to adapt or change course, like nature in an effort for survival.’’

“Silent Encroachment’’ (acrylic on canvas), by Nancy Wood, in her show “Shaping Space, at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, May 1-June 2. The gallery says:

“This series is a visual experiment in stretching, expanding and compressing geometric and optical images. The resulting hypnotic, pulsing, floating patterns, founded in logic, crossover into the emotional realm and provide access to the subconscious. The act of multiplying, dividing, adding, subtracting, and repeating elements by eye and intuition result in a visual translation of an internal experience of the world. Geometry gives way to something more organic and infinite, similar to the evolutionary process in nature. There is an element of trial and error but an opportunity arises to adapt or change course, like nature in an effort for survival.’’

Visions from illness

“Face Object #1 ‘‘ (archival inkjet print from digital photo), by David Weinberg, in the show “If You Could See What I See,’’ by Louise and David Weinberg, at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, May 1-June 2. The gallery says that the pictures in the show were produced during Louise Weinberg’s 15-year struggle with a rare neurologic disease that shares some features with Parkinson’s Disease. This illness and side-effects of medications have affected both her physical abilities and her mental state, “producing vivid hallucinations and altered perception’’.    Galatea says that through discussion with Louise, David Weinberg has produced photographic images that “attempt to depict the visions that Louise experiences. Louise has arranged fragments cut from her drawings and paintings into collages that spring from her unconscious. The works arise from the many degrees of cognitive changes stimulated by the medications treating the neurological illness.’’

“Face Object #1 ‘‘ (archival inkjet print from digital photo), by David Weinberg, in the show “If You Could See What I See,’’ by Louise and David Weinberg, at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, May 1-June 2. The gallery says that the pictures in the show were produced during Louise Weinberg’s 15-year struggle with a rare neurologic disease that shares some features with Parkinson’s Disease. This illness and side-effects of medications have affected both her physical abilities and her mental state, “producing vivid hallucinations and altered perception’’.

Galatea says that through discussion with Louise, David Weinberg has produced photographic images that “attempt to depict the visions that Louise experiences. Louise has arranged fragments cut from her drawings and paintings into collages that spring from her unconscious. The works arise from the many degrees of cognitive changes stimulated by the medications treating the neurological illness.’’