Invasive species and surveillance

    From Ed Andrews's show "Invasive Species,'' at Boston Sculptors Gallery, Nov. 8 through Nov. 10. The gallery says:  "Monumental arboreal structures support rice paper cocoons that seem to breathe in and out, while small bug-like drones buzz overhead, appearing to monitor the movement of unsuspecting viewers. The effect is at once visually seductive, poetic and deeply disconcerting.''  The gallery says that  Andrews's family lost 12 American Elms that shaded their home because of the invasive Dutch Elm disease, which came from Europe. "Today he manages 35 acres of woodland {in Glocester, R.I.} --an extension of his studio and a laboratory for his art practice--where he does his best to contain non-native plants and insects that threaten the eco-system, including an ongoing personal battle with the invasive European Gypsy Moth. These experiences inform Andrews's work, paired with his expressive commentary on the spread of the security and surveillance industry, which like invasive species, can potentially damage the environment, and pose a threat to our shared human economy and well-being.''      

 

From Ed Andrews's show "Invasive Species,'' at Boston Sculptors Gallery, Nov. 8 through Nov. 10. The gallery says:  "Monumental arboreal structures support rice paper cocoons that seem to breathe in and out, while small bug-like drones buzz overhead, appearing to monitor the movement of unsuspecting viewers. The effect is at once visually seductive, poetic and deeply disconcerting.''

The gallery says that  Andrews's family lost 12 American Elms that shaded their home because of the invasive Dutch Elm disease, which came from Europe. "Today he manages 35 acres of woodland {in Glocester, R.I.} --an extension of his studio and a laboratory for his art practice--where he does his best to contain non-native plants and insects that threaten the eco-system, including an ongoing personal battle with the invasive European Gypsy Moth. These experiences inform Andrews's work, paired with his expressive commentary on the spread of the security and surveillance industry, which like invasive species, can potentially damage the environment, and pose a threat to our shared human economy and well-being.''