Photography and the genius of Winslow Homer

  "Winslow Homer at Marshfield {Mass.}, " ca. 1869 (albumen silver print), by an unknown photographer. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine. This is in the show "Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting,'' through Oct. 28. The museum building is famous, having be designed by Charles McKim, who also designed the Rhode Island State House and much of Columbia University.

"Winslow Homer at Marshfield {Mass.}, " ca. 1869 (albumen silver print), by an unknown photographer. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine. This is in the show "Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting,'' through Oct. 28. The museum building is famous, having be designed by Charles McKim, who also designed the Rhode Island State House and much of Columbia University.

  Winslow Homer with 'The Gulf Stream' in his {Prouts Neck, Maine} studio," ca. 1900, (gelatin silver print), by an unidentified photographer.   The museum says:  "This exhibition explores the question of Homer’s relationship with the medium of photography and its impact on his artistic practice. As one attuned to appearances and how to represent them, Homer understood that photography, as a new technology of sight, had much to reveal. This exhibition thus adds an important new dimension to our appreciation of this pioneering American painter, demonstrating his recognition that photography did not undermine, but instead complemented his larger artistic interests.''

Winslow Homer with 'The Gulf Stream' in his {Prouts Neck, Maine} studio," ca. 1900, (gelatin silver print), by an unidentified photographer.

The museum says:

"This exhibition explores the question of Homer’s relationship with the medium of photography and its impact on his artistic practice. As one attuned to appearances and how to represent them, Homer understood that photography, as a new technology of sight, had much to reveal. This exhibition thus adds an important new dimension to our appreciation of this pioneering American painter, demonstrating his recognition that photography did not undermine, but instead complemented his larger artistic interests.''