The meaning of trails

  View of the top of Mt. Greylock, on the Appalachian Trail in the Berkshires, in western Massachusetts.

View of the top of Mt. Greylock, on the Appalachian Trail in the Berkshires, in western Massachusetts.

From Robert Whitcomb's "Digital Diary,'' in GoLocal24.com:

We’re in prime hiking season, and so I suggest reading On Trails: An Exploration (Simon & Schuster), by Robert Moor. As the promo for this beautiful travelogue says: “It’s a groundbreaking exploration of how trails help us understand the world – from tiny ant trails to hiking paths that span continents, from interstate highways to the Internet.’’

There’s lots of rich stuff about the Appalachian Trail, especially about Moor’s complex reactions to hiking it and its quirky creator. (I’ve spent some time on it; it’s grandeur, gloom, green and gray.) There’s plenty of science, philosophy and top-notch and often lyrical nature writing. And he addresses that central question: How do we choose a path through life?