Fountain Street Fine Art

'Yearnings for wholeness'

Work by Joel Moskowitz, in his joint show “Unspooled,’’ with Sylvia Sluis, at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through June 30. The gallery says he “draws long, spiraling lines, mesmerized. He erases and revises over time, building up a shape that seems, finally, both loose and tightly wound. One end of the line typically hangs free, giving the viewer a way into the maze. Ink grows dense and looping like script. He blends minimalism and expressionism with a metallic sheen. His work, says Moskowitz, ‘is influenced by religious icons, yearnings for wholeness.”’

Work by Joel Moskowitz, in his joint show “Unspooled,’’ with Sylvia Sluis, at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through June 30. The gallery says he “draws long, spiraling lines, mesmerized. He erases and revises over time, building up a shape that seems, finally, both loose and tightly wound. One end of the line typically hangs free, giving the viewer a way into the maze. Ink grows dense and looping like script. He blends minimalism and expressionism with a metallic sheen. His work, says Moskowitz, ‘is influenced by religious icons, yearnings for wholeness.”’

Pay attention!

“Self Portrait as a Beautiful Lady’’ (detail), by Arhia Kohlmoos, in the show “Depth of Perception,’’ at Fountain Street Fine Art, Jan. 2-27.    The gallery says the show:     “{E}   xplores the concept of taking notice. For many people this action represents a single moment in time that encourages reflection and to focus one’s attention on the present. It can be viewed as the link between human and spirit; darkness and light; scarcity and abundance. ‘‘

“Self Portrait as a Beautiful Lady’’ (detail), by Arhia Kohlmoos, in the show “Depth of Perception,’’ at Fountain Street Fine Art, Jan. 2-27.

The gallery says the show:

“{E}xplores the concept of taking notice. For many people this action represents a single moment in time that encourages reflection and to focus one’s attention on the present. It can be viewed as the link between human and spirit; darkness and light; scarcity and abundance. ‘‘

'Surreal waiting game'

Left, “So Sophisticated” (oil on canvas), by Alexandra Rozenman; right, “Witness’’ (oil on canvas), by Anita Loomis, in the show “Untold Stories, at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through Dec. 23. .

Left, “So Sophisticated” (oil on canvas), by Alexandra Rozenman; right, “Witness’’ (oil on canvas), by Anita Loomis, in the show “Untold Stories, at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through Dec. 23.
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To see a video of the show “Untold Stories,’’ by Anita Loomis and Alexandra Rozenman, please hit this link.

This is the show’s last weekend at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston.

From Artscope’s review:

“The immediate condition and activity conveyed within the pictures made by painters Anita Loomis and Alexandra Rozenman is extrapolation. …{T}he paintings allow and welcome conjecture. The artists have created environments that focus the viewer’s attention towards inference, encouraging the seer to intellectually step into and become part of vague spaces and curious scenes — to participate in a surreal guessing game.

“For the viewer, the stories within the compositions are open-ended and puzzling, being directed in possibility by the depicted visual objects and glimpses of human form. We approach these compositions by asking what’s going on. Some paintings depict relatable imagery such as domestic interiors, landscapes and active scenes, while others are expressive and fantastical with abstracted and speculative shapes and figures.’’




'Stillness within change'

 "Preface That" (detail), (encaustic paint), by Mary Marley, in her joint show with photographer Rebecca Skinner, at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through May 27.      The gallery says:  "Marley and Skinner’s work explores the paradox of moments of stillness within larger patterns of change. Each part is connected to the whole but not subsumed by it. The work deals with the distinctness of passing moments as they meld into the current of time. Everything is in flux, but nothing is lost.''  "Mary Marley generates wholeness from fragments by patching together patterns and structures from disparate times and cultures. Having manipulated oils, paper cuttings, and mixed media, she has most recently found expression through encaustic painting. The layering of these pigments creates a unique luminous quality to her graphic narratives.''

 "Preface That" (detail), (encaustic paint), by Mary Marley, in her joint show with photographer Rebecca Skinner, at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through May 27.  

The gallery says:

"Marley and Skinner’s work explores the paradox of moments of stillness within larger patterns of change. Each part is connected to the whole but not subsumed by it. The work deals with the distinctness of passing moments as they meld into the current of time. Everything is in flux, but nothing is lost.''

"Mary Marley generates wholeness from fragments by patching together patterns and structures from disparate times and cultures. Having manipulated oils, paper cuttings, and mixed media, she has most recently found expression through encaustic painting. The layering of these pigments creates a unique luminous quality to her graphic narratives.''

Mobile patent-medicine clinic

Work by Stephen Martin in his joint show  with Sorin Bica, "Identity,'' at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through April 29.    The gallery says that Mr. Martin "is a mixed-media artist and sculptor who works primarily with antique photos and found objects to fashion unique human stories. His work is about reclamation; while he incorporates found objects to form the 'ground' of the pieces, the figurative element is of primary importance.

Work by Stephen Martin in his joint show  with Sorin Bica, "Identity,'' at Fountain Street Fine Art, Boston, through April 29.

The gallery says that Mr. Martin "is a mixed-media artist and sculptor who works primarily with antique photos and found objects to fashion unique human stories. His work is about reclamation; while he incorporates found objects to form the 'ground' of the pieces, the figurative element is of primary importance.

 

 

 

 

Where light is a Maine event

"The Summit at Dusk,''  by ROY PERKINSON, in his show "The Poetry of Light: New Work by Roy Perkinson,'' at Fountain Street Fine Art, Framingham, Mass., Sept. 10-Oct. 4.

The summit here is that of Cadillac Mountain, in Acadia National Park, Maine.

Secrets of roadside chairs

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"Superior Comfort, ''by MARIE CRAIG, in her "Around the Curve'' show - a series of photographs of chairs left by the side of the road. It will run May 14-June 7 at Fountain Street Fine Art, Framingham.

She says: "When it hits the curb, a chair is at a turning point. Part detective story, part social history, each chair holds many secrets. The chair also serves as a metaphor for all of the things we admit into our homes, and tells the story of consumption and disposability.''

For some reason, this reminds me of my mother's irritating habit of leaving old furniture,  some of it Victorian and, we learned later,  to become quite valuable, on the side of the road to be picked up by junk collectors in our semi-rural, seaside neighborhood.

I remember one day seeing a collie curled up very comfortably in the sun on one of the old sofas that my feckless mother had left at the curb.

Few if anyone in our town leashed their dogs, who often attacked people -- especially postmen -- and  killed chickens on the farm across the street. That led to a potentially dangerous encounter between my father and the infuriated gentleman farmer, Mr. Dean, after our vicious (to  other animals, including  human strangers) Rhodesian Ridgeback  mix raided the coop.

They both had guns, and I think that Mr. Dean was close to using his -- on our dog and my father.

(Come to think of it, pretty much everyone in our neighborhood had guns -- usually 22's and shotguns. There were also quite a few service revolvers around.)

-- Robert Whitcomb

Flying through Framingham

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This  sculpture, '"Gullet'' (cast iron rings, chicken wire, cheesecloth and paper), is a collaborative piece by Carrie Childs Antonini, Denise Driscoll and Sara Fine-Wilson. It's in the  "Multiplicity Members Group Show'' through Dec. 15 at Fountain Street Fine Art, Framingham, Mass.

 

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Reconstructing history

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Sculpture  by SARA FINE-WILSON in her part of the "Gaze and Extension'' show Fountain Street Fine Art,  Framingham, through Nov. 2. Her art, says the gallery, explores breaking down things and "then rebuilding them multiple times as a way to create history in visual form.''