Kingston Gallery

Reconstructing old books

“Slowpoke’’ (painted silk on vintage book paper collage), by Conny Goelz Schmitt, in her show “Neverending Stories’’ at Kingston Gallery, Boston, through June 30. The gallery explains: “Her geometric collage work channels stories from the vintage books she uses to create her work. The collages, assemblages and sculptures play with deconstruction, reconstruction, and changing dimensionality – often in one piece. Interactive sculptures offer different viewpoints of stories. Small work on vintage book boards invites the viewer to make up their own story and wall objects seemingly tell stories on another level. The work leads to new interpretations of past and present and opens up the viewer’s outlook to the future.’’

“Slowpoke’’ (painted silk on vintage book paper collage), by Conny Goelz Schmitt, in her show “Neverending Stories’’ at Kingston Gallery, Boston, through June 30. The gallery explains: “Her geometric collage work channels stories from the vintage books she uses to create her work. The collages, assemblages and sculptures play with deconstruction, reconstruction, and changing dimensionality – often in one piece. Interactive sculptures offer different viewpoints of stories. Small work on vintage book boards invites the viewer to make up their own story and wall objects seemingly tell stories on another level. The work leads to new interpretations of past and present and opens up the viewer’s outlook to the future.’’

Her geometric collage work channels stories from the vintage books she uses to create her work. The collages, assemblages and sculptures play with deconstruction, reconstruction, and changing dimensionality – often in one piece. Interactive sculptures offer different viewpoints of stories. Small work on vintage book boards invites the viewer to make up their own story and wall objects seemingly tell stories on another level. The work leads to new interpretations of past and present and opens up the viewer’s outlook to the future.


Conny Goelz Schmitt, Slowpoke, 2018, painted silk on vintage book paper collage, 47" x 20" x 2"

Absorbing the forest

“Rhododendron Forest 1” (incised photograph) by Hilary Tolan, in her show “Emerge,’’ at the Kingston Gallery, Boston, through Feb. 14.    The gallery says that her “images, both delicate and fierce, encourage the viewer to slow down and absorb the stillness and intricacy they offer. Emerge is a collection of photographs and drawings initiated 10 years ago during a three-week residency and daily walks into an overgrown rhododendron forest. ‘‘

“Rhododendron Forest 1” (incised photograph) by Hilary Tolan, in her show “Emerge,’’ at the Kingston Gallery, Boston, through Feb. 14.

The gallery says that her “images, both delicate and fierce, encourage the viewer to slow down and absorb the stillness and intricacy they offer. Emerge is a collection of photographs and drawings initiated 10 years ago during a three-week residency and daily walks into an overgrown rhododendron forest. ‘‘

Doesn't work well in a greenhouse

Gatekeeper   (oil on canvas), by Joan Baldwin, in her show “Unkempt Gardens,’’ at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Dec. 5-30.     The gallery says: Her inspiration stems from “the stories and histories developed when gardens are left to be in their natural states. The imaginary spirits of ancient civilizations lingering in the gardens have become her subjects. Within the lush settings Baldwin creates a mood with mythical figures, statuary and gargoyles designed to delight and bring history alive. Interspersed with the large paintings are small portraits in frames that are part of the collection though seem simultaneously independent. Baldwin’s portraits, with names implying that they are family members, were influenced by the gargoyles she saw on churches and buildings while in southern Italy in 2017. Though the gargoyles were originally intended to be frightening and ward off evil spirits, the personified portraits seem comical in their new environment and interact with their lush counterparts in unexpected ways.’’

Gatekeeper (oil on canvas), by Joan Baldwin, in her show “Unkempt Gardens,’’ at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Dec. 5-30.

The gallery says: Her inspiration stems from “the stories and histories developed when gardens are left to be in their natural states. The imaginary spirits of ancient civilizations lingering in the gardens have become her subjects. Within the lush settings Baldwin creates a mood with mythical figures, statuary and gargoyles designed to delight and bring history alive. Interspersed with the large paintings are small portraits in frames that are part of the collection though seem simultaneously independent. Baldwin’s portraits, with names implying that they are family members, were influenced by the gargoyles she saw on churches and buildings while in southern Italy in 2017. Though the gargoyles were originally intended to be frightening and ward off evil spirits, the personified portraits seem comical in their new environment and interact with their lush counterparts in unexpected ways.’’

'Allusions to the body'

"Fused'' (mixed media), by Linda Leslie Brown, in her show "Plastiglomerate,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Oct. 3-28. The gallery says:    "As a sculptor  Linda Leslie Brown ’s work metaphorically plays with the literal and the imagined as seemingly random, mostly discarded materials interact to build works rife with allusions to the body. At the same time, her sculptural assemblages suggest the plastic, provisional and uncertain world of a new and transgenic nature where corporeal and mechanical entities recombine, serving as relics of possible futures and symbols of human behavior on the global environment. Her sculptures suggest a creaturely symbiosis as with holobionts: assemblages of different species that form ecological units.''

"Fused'' (mixed media), by Linda Leslie Brown, in her show "Plastiglomerate,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Oct. 3-28. The gallery says:

"As a sculptor Linda Leslie Brown’s work metaphorically plays with the literal and the imagined as seemingly random, mostly discarded materials interact to build works rife with allusions to the body. At the same time, her sculptural assemblages suggest the plastic, provisional and uncertain world of a new and transgenic nature where corporeal and mechanical entities recombine, serving as relics of possible futures and symbols of human behavior on the global environment. Her sculptures suggest a creaturely symbiosis as with holobionts: assemblages of different species that form ecological units.''

Still in the textile industry

"Window' (extruded pigmented medium), by Erica Licea-Lane, at the Kingston Gallery, Boston, through July 1.    Licea-Lane, a former textile artist, uses deep layers of paint to create surface density and deep structure, creating intricate abstract pieces. Licea-Lane says that "They speak about time, process, and the textiles that became the common thread in my childhood."  

"Window' (extruded pigmented medium), by Erica Licea-Lane, at the Kingston Gallery, Boston, through July 1.

Licea-Lane, a former textile artist, uses deep layers of paint to create surface density and deep structure, creating intricate abstract pieces. Licea-Lane says that "They speak about time, process, and the textiles that became the common thread in my childhood." 

'Delving into the past'

"Untitled #16" (mixed media on paper), by Jamal Thorne, in his show "Bootleg Delorean,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Feb. 28-April 1.      The gallery says:    "These new paintings by Jamal Thorne {are} composite experiences that embody the dynamic of delving into the past while being confronted with the idiosyncrasies of the present. Events unfold and time moves forward. Thorne builds layers of paint and tape covering textured surfaces, with a process informed by the Civil Rights Movement, current and past. Each new layer preserves and makes an impression while some elements from the previous layers are lost. For Thorne the process of cutting deep into the accumulating layers serves to mimic the act of reclaiming a connection to the past, while the finished work is a documentation of shared experience .''

"Untitled #16" (mixed media on paper), by Jamal Thorne, in his show "Bootleg Delorean,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Feb. 28-April 1.
 

The gallery says:

"These new paintings by Jamal Thorne {are} composite experiences that embody the dynamic of delving into the past while being confronted with the idiosyncrasies of the present. Events unfold and time moves forward. Thorne builds layers of paint and tape covering textured surfaces, with a process informed by the Civil Rights Movement, current and past. Each new layer preserves and makes an impression while some elements from the previous layers are lost. For Thorne the process of cutting deep into the accumulating layers serves to mimic the act of reclaiming a connection to the past, while the finished work is a documentation of shared experience.''

Runaway 'Strategic Planning'

strategic.jpg

Image from "Strategic Planning,'' by Chantal Zakari, at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Jan. 3-28. The gallery explains:

"Chantal Zakari creates a collection of flags that reference business nomenclature which is widely being used by academic administrations. The business term 'Strategic Plan' originated in the military but is now a staple of every university, liberal arts college, and even small art schools. It functions as a promise for positive change along with improvements for the institution's immediate future.

"The designs of these pennants, sailing burgees and medieval gonfalons are a study ... with visual elements from various historical periods. Collected on Internet clipart sites, the vernacular imagery points to a hollow vocabulary: SWOT for strength, weaknesses, opportunities, threats; Competitive Landscape; Synergy; Global Imperative; Innovation Catalyst; Leadership Workshop… The accompanying artist's book for the exhibition is designed in the style of a product catalog. Here, the banners are seen within context, in college specific spaces such as faculty offices, dorm rooms, libraries and art studios.

"At a time when an increasing number of small colleges are under financial stress due to a shrinking student population caused by enormous increases in tuition, these art objects stand as reminders of the true ideals of higher education that are at risk.''

Contradictory materials

Untitled work by Veronica A. Perez (saudade, hair, steel, mortar and fake flower),  in  her show "Veronica A. Perez: untitled,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Jan. 3-28. The gallery says she uses material as language to express displacement, discomfort and the desire to belong, using contradictory materials.

Untitled work by Veronica A. Perez (saudade, hair, steel, mortar and fake flower),  in  her show "Veronica A. Perez: untitled,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Jan. 3-28. The gallery says she uses material as language to express displacement, discomfort and the desire to belong, using contradictory materials.

Going with the grain

"Up Around the Sun'' (diptych) (acrylic on wood), by Rose Olson. in her show "BRIGHT COOL and HOT,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Nov. 29-Dec. 30. She paints on wooden panels patterned with natural grain, as the gallery says, "each specific to their character as a once-living tree. These patterns are as unique as fingerprints and as important to Olson as the colors she uses.''

"Up Around the Sun'' (diptych) (acrylic on wood), by Rose Olson. in her show "BRIGHT COOL and HOT,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Nov. 29-Dec. 30. She paints on wooden panels patterned with natural grain, as the gallery says, "each specific to their character as a once-living tree. These patterns are as unique as fingerprints and as important to Olson as the colors she uses.''

Ice Age reminders

"Erratic 4 Untitled'' (acrylic on paper), by Mira Cantor, in her show "Erratics, works on paper by Mira Cantor,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Nov. 1-26 .  The show is inspired by the forms of the same name created by the Ice Age and found all over New England, virtually all of which wascovered by ice 15,000 to 20,000 years ago. Ms.Cantor told the gallery:  "These erratics are palpable forms of energy, eroding in slow motion."    

"Erratic 4 Untitled'' (acrylic on paper), by Mira Cantor, in her show "Erratics, works on paper by Mira Cantor,'' at Kingston Gallery, Boston, Nov. 1-26. The show is inspired by the forms of the same name created by the Ice Age and found all over New England, virtually all of which wascovered by ice 15,000 to 20,000 years ago. Ms.Cantor told the gallery:  "These erratics are palpable forms of energy, eroding in slow motion."