Lanoue Gallery

Layers of light and shadow

“Slow Autumn’’ (mixed media on paper), by Sabrina Garrasi, in her show at Lanoue Gallery, Boston, through April 27.    The gallery says:    “Through Garrasi's deft handling of watercolor, gouache, ink, acrylic, tempura and 22kt gold leaf, she creates translucent layers with ethereal qualities of light and shadow. ’’

“Slow Autumn’’ (mixed media on paper), by Sabrina Garrasi, in her show at Lanoue Gallery, Boston, through April 27.

The gallery says:

“Through Garrasi's deft handling of watercolor, gouache, ink, acrylic, tempura and 22kt gold leaf, she creates translucent layers with ethereal qualities of light and shadow.’’

'Life between screens'

"Homage 4533" (dye sublimation print on aluminum), by Irene Mamiye, at Lanoue Gallery, Boston.

"Homage 4533" (dye sublimation print on aluminum), by Irene Mamiye, at Lanoue Gallery, Boston.

 

The gallery says:

"Influenced by her own personal history and artists as diverse as Laszlo Moholy ­Nagy and Gerhard Richter, Mamiye employs intricate and labor-­intensive processes to challenge what is expected of the photographic medium. Culling photographs from social media, Mamiye transforms the plenitude of public images into richly layered works that hint at a life lived between screens. With a playful yet mordant humor, Mamiye creates pieces packed with art historical depth and pop cultural abundance.''

Her work uses photography, video and digital imaging techniques. "With light, color and movement, she blurs distinctions between physical and virtual reality.''

'Basic interactions'

sardi.jpg

"Multicolor Installation'' (painted steel), by Carolina Sardi, in her show at the Lanoue Gallery, Boston, through Oct. 15.  She says: "My art is my way of expressing my world vision. I try to convey maximum information in the most minimal but essential forms. Although I work mainly with steel, my sculptures and installations have an organic sensibility that reflects my interest in the basic interactions of life. The reference to geometry, natural shapes and the use of positive and negative spaces are a response to my search for a balance between opposites."

Sand on the wall

 

"Shore'' (mixed materials with paint on panel), by Luanne E. Witkowski, in her show "New Observations,'' at Lanoue Gallery, Boston, only through April 30.

"The reflective qualities of the gleaming, color-saturated works shift with the perspective of the viewer. Glittering textures awaken tactile responses and are reminiscent of sand and other specific elements of landscape. The works continue to exemplify Witkowski's ability to echo and amplify the experience of being in nature,'' the gallery notes say.

Archiving print on paper

Artist Paul Rousso in front of one of his multimedia creations in his show through Sept. 27 at Lanoue Gallery, Boston.

Mr. Rousso has had a fine time using fragments of American commercial and popular culture.

In one of his artist's statements, he wrote:

"That which brought us out of the Dark Ages, the printed word, which also began with the Bible on Gutenberg’s press, is definitely in its final death knell. After hundreds of years of the printed word, ink on paper, is on it’s way out.

"Soon there will be no new magazines, no newspapers, no new books, everyone will have their reader, I-pad etc., to which they can download whatever they want, whenever they want, where ever they are. The last paper and ink to go away will likely be our paper currency. Perhaps the audience for my work is only just being born.''

Yes, the shift to digital will continue but as Anne Mangen and other scientific researchers have found, our understanding and retention of text is considerably higher when we read it on paper than on a screen. Life on a screen is already taking a big bite out of developed thought.

-- Robert Whitcomb