The latest marriage of two great dictatorships

  Stalin and Nazi Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop shaking hands after the signing of the Nazi-Soviet pact on Aug. 23, 1939. The two tyrannies then proceeded to carve up Poland between themselves.

Stalin and Nazi Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop shaking hands after the signing of the Nazi-Soviet pact on Aug. 23, 1939. The two tyrannies then proceeded to carve up Poland between themselves.

From Robert Whitcomb's "Digital Diary,'' in GoLocal24.com:

Divisions in the West worsened in part by Trump’s nationalist pseudo-populism are making it easier for Russia and China to solidify what has effectively become in recent years an alliance. (Think of a milder version of the Nazi-Soviet relationship of 1939-early 1941.)

Not only are the Russians and Chinese cooperating on many military and other security matters aimed against the West, they are also coordinating their economic expansionism. They’re doing this, in  part, through connections between Russia’s Eurasian Economic Union (aimed at keeping former Soviet Central Asian “republics’’ under heavy Kremlin influence) and China’s Belt and Road infrastructure and economic development and trade project, aimed at expanding China’s  global economic, security and cultural power across Eurasia.

With the decline of American leadership of the Western Alliance as the latter seeks to better defend itself from the two great expansionist dictatorships, Western liberal democracy seems more fragile than it has been for a long, long time. While I admire French President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Theresa May for pushing back against, especially, Russian aggression, the U.S., because of its size and power should take the lead.  But the Trump administration doesn’t seem very interested.

To read a thoughtful piece on this – “The Geopolitics of the Beijing-Moscow consensus,’’ please hit this link.